March 2012
 

Human Papillomavirus is the most common sexually transmitted virus, with 6.2 million new cases annually. It causes genital warts and HPV- related cervical cancer in women, as well as an illness called respiratory papillomatosis. The virus is also a known cause of anorectal and throat cancers. The highest infection rate occurs among adolescents and young adults. The vaccine became available in 2006 for ages 9 to 26 years, with a recommendation for routine immunization beginning at age 11 to 12 years. It is a 3 dose series. It is expected to prevent up to 70% of cervical cancers. Side effects are minimal and rare and consist of occasional low grade fever and soreness at the injection site.

In 2010, HPV vaccine was licensed for use in males as well. In men, the virus is frequently asymptomatic, but may cause genital warts, and is responsible for types of penile cancer, anorectal cancer, and throat cancer. We recommend that all adolescents be immunized against this disease.

If you have additional questions or concerns about vaccines, please visit our website. The EVCC website has links to numerous helpful organizations that have great detail on the research involving vaccines.

 
 

Meningococcal vaccine (Menactra) is effective at preventing a very rare but highly deadly bacterial meningitis. An older version of this vaccine was previously given to some college students. The current vaccine came out in 2005 and is recommended for all children at age 11. A second dose is recommended between age 16 and 18. Side effects are minimal and rare and consist of occasional low grade fever and soreness at the injection site.

 
March 2012
 

Influenza vaccine is available yearly for the prevention of this illness in 90% of individuals. Influenza vaccine is recommended for all children starting at 6 months of age. The vaccine is strongly recommended for any child with a chronic medical condition such as asthma, diabetes, or a heart or kidney disorder. The vaccine is available beginning in the fall of each year and it is recommended that it be administered between August and until Influenza season ends. Side effects are infrequent and minimal, consisting of local soreness at the injection site and low grade fever. The vaccine may be administered to any child older than 6 months of age. For children under age 9 that are receiving the vaccine for the first time, 2 doses given 1 month apart are recommended for optimal immune system response.

An intranasal spray influenza vaccine (FluMist) is available for most children as an alternative. The Influenza Vaccine is available in our office without an appointment, however, please try and utilize the least busy times of day (early morning or during or just after lunch). There is less wait when our “flu clinic” appointment slots are utilized.

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